Make Your Headings Count

If you're too lazy to read any more than two lines, the summary of the piece is this:

Make your heading a statement, not a title.

If you want to know more, read on!

For a handout/worksheet on this, click here.

This week we’ll have a look at an answer I gave in the 2018 LC Paper (featured in What It Takes), and focus in on the importance of making your headings count! We're going to use Q5 (A) to do it so let jump in.

2018 HL LC Business Q5 (A)

Supermac’s is an Irish fast food franchise which was set up in Ballinasloe 40 years ago by Pat McDonagh. In May 2017 Supermac's took home the award for "Franchise of the Year" at the Irish Franchise Awards.

Source: www.hospitalityireland.com

Outline the advantages and disadvantages for a business in the fast food sector of choosing franchising as a method of business expansion. (20 marks)

Marking Scheme: (At least one of each required.) 2@7 (4+3) plus 1@6 (3+3)

 

So before beginning, lets have a look at what is required from the question.

1. Verb: Outline – so make a statement/heading for (4/3 marks) and develop it for + 3 marks.

2. In your development you should link the fast food sector as it is mentioned in the question. Reference to Supermac’s itself isn’t necessary as its not specifically mentioned in the question.

3. The context for your answer is as the Franchisor not the Franchisee, as it is about business expansion and not starting a new business (i.e. by using a franchise instead of your own new brand name). Students answering with advantages and disadvantages for a Franchisee, of using a Franchise when setting up a business would score zero.

The specific thing I want to address today is the role of the heading in your answer:

YOUR HEADING SHOULD BE A STATEMENT, NOT A TITLE

When we look at my script from the 2018 Leaving Cert, we will see examples of headings that will get marks, and examples of headings that don’t, and it’s a great specific change students can make that they may not even be sure they’re making!

Example #1

A good heading. My heading is making a statement or showing an impact. I’ve said that expansion is Quick/Fast, so get the 4 marks for that statement, meaning I only have to collect another 3 marks which I get in a couple of lines.

Example #2

Again, a good heading.

My heading is making a statement or showing an impact. I’ve said that sales, fees and profits will increase, so get the 4 marks for that statement, meaning I only have to collect another 3 marks which I get in a couple of lines.

In both examples, I have full marks very quickly and end up not needing half the answer I have given for full marks as I’ve stated, and developed my statement, linking the fast food industry, by using effective headings that make a statement.

Example #3

My heading here gets zero.

It is a correct title for what I’m about to write, but I actually haven’t shown any impact on the ‘Standard / Brand Name’. You can see that I have to then get marks for my statement in the opening part of my answer, and rely on my extra information in the second half for the development marks. What I should have written was:

You can see in this answer, the heading is a statement, so would receive 3 marks, and then I need to write way less to develop it, saving time and still scoring full marks.

Example #4

My heading here gets zero.

It is a correct title for what I’m about to write, but I actually haven’t shown any impact on the ‘Level of work / time spent’. You can see that I have to then get marks for my statement in the opening part of my answer, and rely on my extra information in the second half for the development marks. What I should have written was:

You can see in this answer, the heading is a statement, so would receive 3 marks, and then I need to write way less to develop it, saving time and still being able to score full marks.

So, when you’re answering any question for LC Business, make sure to make your headings count!

Check out other recent blog posts about making and taking your own class exams, how to 'distinguish' and many more at our LC Business Blog.


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